Snow Policy Explanation ... Let It Snow!

Happy 2019 to you all!  Here's to another year of poop-free yards!  We'd like to kick off the new year by reviewing our snow policy. 


If there has been only a very light dusting of snow, we and our team of Scoopers can find what we are looking for and go about business as usual. But even when the grass is still visible in heavier dustings it becomes difficult to find deposits since they are lower than grass height. So if it snows much more than a very light dusting, we may need to skip that week's scheduled scooping as we cannot, alas, pick up what we cannot see.

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When snow is already on the ground, though, we absolutely forge ahead as usual to get your yard all cleaned up.  The only exception to this is when freezing rain has created slick and dangerous conditions.  But most often, the issue usually ends up being the timing of the snowfall and how close it happens before your scheduled service.

If you decide to clean up during a week that is missed due to snow, please let us know and we will credit your account for that week.  Otherwise, we do charge your usual amount as there is a double job to do when your Scooper returns and it's usually under "frightful" conditions.

We hope this helps clear things up before the dead of winter hits!
Cheers,
Tina and Emily LaBeaume

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POOlution: The Environmental Problem of Dog Waste

A single dog poop can contain millions of germs, parasites and bacteria that are harmful to human and dog health alike.  The Environmental Protection Agency places dog waste in the same category as herbicides, insecticides, oil, grease and other toxic chemicals.  And with the number of dogs living in America on the rise, with 89.7 million recorded in 2017, the amount of this toxic waste in our environment is also on the rise.  Dog poop that is left on the ground can be carried up in stormwater and make its way into our untreated waterways.  This poses a great risk to organisms that depend on those ecosystems as well as people who use them for recreational purposes.  In order to protect New Jersey's five water regions and has twenty watershed management areas (WMAs), and our environment as a whole, we must be more conscious about how we handle and dispose of our dogs' waste.

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The first thing you can do to help minimize the negative impacts of dog waste on our environment is simply to make sure that it is picked up on a regular basis.  Ideally, dog waste should be picked up as soon as it hits the ground and this is especially true when you are walking your dog in your community.  But every practical dog owner knows that this just isn't feasible when it comes to dogs using a private outdoor space like a yard or dog run on a regular basis.  In this situation the best frequency of pickup really depends on the size of the space, number of dogs and humans using it and its proximity to waterways.  But the safest bet, as a general rule, is to pick up collected dog waste once every week.  This is what we recommend for most of our clients.

When we go to a yard for a cleaning we use 13 gallon trash bags to line a bin into which we deposit each pile of poop that we find using a hoe-like periscopic tool.  At an average stop we collect one bag and then place that bag into a second bag before placing it into the trash or hauling it away (either way, its destination is the landfill.)  During first time cleanups, like the one pictured below, and at yards that are used by three or more dogs it is more common to use 2 or more bags.  With an average of 25-30 stops per route, collecting at least 2 bags per stop, Big Business Scoopers alone uses 50-60 plastic trash bags per route.  Our Scoopers manage 17 routes per week over several New Jersey counties, bringing this total to at least 850 plastic bags used per week.  Of course, plastic is currently the optimal way to contain this toxic waste quickly and effectively, in order to prevent the spread of illness, but we do understand the implications of our business using so much of it.  Sometimes, it feels like we are canceling out the good we do of removing dog waste by also depositing so much plastic into our environment.  Talk about a conundrum!

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We pride ourselves on helping create a world in which dogs (and their humans) can live together even more harmoniously by enjoying safer and healthier outdoor spaces.  Thinking responsibly about how we are impacting our communities and environments by how we handle dog poop pick up and removal is an integral part of constantly striving toward that goal.  And to that end, we are, in this 15th year of business, beginning to look into options for disposing of dog waste in a more sustainable and eco-friendly way.  It will likely be a many years journey of discovery along which we are sure to make mistakes and learn some stinky lessons.  But we feel that it is imperative that we always attempt to do our small part.

The options are many and varied for offering our customers greener options.  We can swap 13 gallon plastic bags for ASTM 6400 certified large compostable bags like those offered by EcoSafe or BioBag, which will break down after reaching the landfill thus reducing plastics waste.  There is a product called Doggie Drain that seamlessly hooks up to a building's outdoor sewer line, allowing our Scoopers to flush (with a hose) dog waste directly into the sewer system.  Some trail blazers in the pet waste removal industry, like Green Scoop in Ohio,  are partnering with local water treatment plants or companies that have the capability to convert dog poop into natural gas and electricity.  Then there are DIY dog poop composter products like the Doggie Doolie which could be good options for dog owners with a lot of property and an open mind about composting right at home!  And there are certainly others that we have not yet come across.  We hope to share what we learn here on the blog as well as on social media so please feel free to follow along on this journey and share your thoughts and comments. 

Here's to greener dog poop!

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Is Your Backyard Safe For Your Dog?

Having a pet dog is awesome. There’s nothing like the love and fun you get from your furry friend.  And the unconditional love and excitement they show when you come home is worth any hassle. That’s why you take good care of your dog.

But is your backyard safe? Too many times, you hear stories about dogs who escape under a fence or get sick from a toxic plant. That’s why you need to inspect your backyard (or any part of your yard that’s fenced in). Before you can make sure things are safe, though, it pays to know what kind of problems to look for.

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Common Backyard Problems

By far, the biggest problem here is your fence. As Fence Authority explains, there are several ways your fence might not be good for your dog. Open-style fences can let dogs climb over it, while damage such as a missing board can give just enough space for your pet to squeeze through. The same is true for gaps under the fence. (Note that many dogs can get through gaps you might think too small for them.)

Although not common, there can be plants in your backyard toxic to your dog. Flowers like foxglove and crocus can make your dog very sick. You should also look around for any nests of bees or wasps, as dogs can easily be allergic to their stings.

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You also have to be careful with how long you let your dog play in the yard. Dogs need some time to run around outside, but leaving them out for too long means you can miss your dog’s needs. Remember that dogs run in packs. Since you’re the owner, you and your family are the pet’s pack. They need to spend time with you, so don’t think spending hours and hours in the yard is a good thing.

Protecting Your Dog

You’ve looked around your backyard and noticed a few problems. What should you do about them?

Notes From A Dog Walker explains that you can make a fence more secure by adding some landscaping. If your dog is a jumper or climber, put down some shrubs and bushes along the inside of the fence. This blocks your dog from escaping this way. If you have a chain-link fence, buy some bamboo rolls or slats to cover up the chains. Not only will this help stop your dog from getting through the fence, it looks great and gives some more privacy to your yard.

When it comes to plants, you can always pull toxic flowers. But as you try to keep your yard bright and green, skip the pesticides and weed killers. Both contain poison that can sit on the surface of grass and plants for days. If your dog licks either, they could get sick. And if you grow a garden, put a barrier around it. Onions, tomatoes, and chives can hurt your pet.

When To Hire A Contractor

At some point, you may have to give up trying to patch that old fence and get a new one installed. That’s especially true if you have an aggressive dog that likes to dig or charge. As strangers and animals move around just beyond the fence, your dog can turn a small gap into an escape route.

To take down and install a new chain-link fence in Newark, NJ, HomeAdvisor estimates the costs to be between $1,115 - $2,892 and will take around two days. A contractor can also repair or reinforce your fence as needed.

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Protect Your Dog

Letting your dog use the backyard is more than just convenient. It’s a great way to give your dog some exercise and fun. But you still need to keep your backyard safe. Make sure your fence is secure and replace it if not. Then remove any toxic plants and skip the chemicals for your lawn. This will help your pet dog stay healthy and happy.

Cindy Aldridge is passionate about dogs and pets and loves sharing her thoughts and insights on being a responsible dog owner. 

It helps to have support in the effort to keep your yard safe!  The Pooper Scooper that regularly visits your yard from Big Business Scoopers will also keep an eye out for any potential problems in your yard that could pose a threat to the health and safety of your dog.  Every Scooper is trained to report anything potentially hazardous back to our office so that we can contact you immediately.

Pooper App is BullS**t but Pooper Scooper Companies Do Exist

Last week we started to see media coverage pour in for a new app called Pooper.  It's tagline was "Your dog's poop in someone else's hands."  The idea was that when your dog pooped in a public place you could log its location and call for a pooper scooper to come and pick it up for you.  Many started dubbing it the Uber for dog poop.  Newsweek, The Washington Post, Fast CompanyMother Nature Network and many more have covered the phenomena of this app (and/or how it turned out to be fake.)

We were skeptical that such a business could ultimately work.  (How could you keep the price low enough to attract users but high enough to attract would-be pooper scoopers?)  But unlike many, we were not very skeptical that such a business existed.  In fact, we were keeping an eye on it and requesting information about their progress.  After all, who knows better than we Professional Pooper Scoopers about how high the demand is for dog waste removal in a country where there are an estimated 70-80 million dogs in residence?

The Pooper app turned out to be an art project aimed at satirizing our app-obsessed culture.  Does your dog poop?  There's an app for that.

But, of course, Pooper turned out to be an art project aimed at satirizing our app-obsessed culture.  Does your dog poop?  There's an app for that!  Well, it turns out that there isn't.  But the good news is there is a company for it!  As long as your dog is doing his or her business on your property we will happily come and scoop it up for you.  No app needed.